U.S. Homebuyers Survey: What New Home Shoppers Wanted in 2012

by reddoor on January 22, 2013

In 2012 there was a revived and growing interest in new homes for sale in markets like Arizona, California and Colorado. Thanks to a national home shopper survey conducted by Builder Homesite, we now have a multi-regional infographic that tells us what mattered most to this expanding population of homebuyers.

New Homebuyers Survey

The 2012 home shopper survey revealed that in all regions of the United States, the top three priorities for home buyers were the same:

  1. Quality of construction
  2. Safer neighborhoods
  3. Better floor plans

The regional differences started to emerge after the top three, where buyers started to distinguish among factors like more living space, lower maintenance costs, energy efficiency, costs per square foot, and architectural design. Here’s a regional breakdown of priorities and preferences among home shoppers in the Pacific, Mountain, North Central, Mid Atlantic, South Atlantic and South Central states

  • Pacific: lower cost per square foot, lower maintenance costs, more living space
  • Mountain: more living space, architecture/overall design, lower maintenance costs
  • North Central: lower cost per square foot, more living space, lower maintenance costs
  • Mid Atlantic: lower maintenance costs, lower cost per square foot, and more living space
  • South Atlantic: lower maintenance costs, lower cost per square foot, energy efficiency
  • South Central: lower maintenance costs, energy efficiency, lower cost per square foot

Shea Homes is pleased to see that home buyers share the priorities that have made us one of the country’s most respected home builders. Find out more at Sheahomes.com.

The infographic was created by Builder Homesite, a consortium of 32 of the nation’s largest home builders set on increasing awareness of the benefits of buying new versus existing homes.

About the author

Josh Englander is a novelist and the founder of DesignLens, an online architectural publication that explores residential design and land planning concepts in America.

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